Redistricting Information

The redistricting has been completed

and there are major changes.

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 7

Here’s the good news, Washington Township remains in Congressional District 7 and Tom Malinowski is still our Congressman in Washington, D.C. The not so good news – CD 7 has been drawn such that it is extremely competitive, so much so that the Republicans are smiling broadly. Although it will be a tough fight again this year for Tom Malinowski to hold his seat in November 2022 election it is still doable. But we need to help and fight!

The details:

On December 22, 2021, the Redistricting Commission adopted the “New Jersey Congressional Districts: 2022-2031” map. The adopted map was filed with the Secretary of State on January 6, 2022.

The new 7th district picks up all of Warren County, and Mendham Borough and part of Mendham Township in Morris.  Scotch Plains, which had been split with the 12th, sits entirely in the 7th, along with the addition of Fanwood and Rahway and part of Linden.  Bridgewater and Hillsborough are split between the 7th and 12th districts.  The 7th adds nine towns in Sussex: Andover Township, Byram, Fredon, Green, Hopatcong, Ogdensburg, Sparta, Stillwater and Walpack. 

On the other side, Millburn in Essex County and Dover in Morris County are shifted to the 11th District. While Cranford, Garwood, Kenilworth and the entirety of Union Township in Union are moved into the 10th District, and Montgomery, North Plainfield, Rocky Hill in Somerset move to the 12th District.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Tom Malinowski gets a more difficult, but not unwinnable, district by taking in all of Warren County and parts of Sussex County, while losing Democratic towns in the east like Millburn. But he’s not DOA.  This 7th district is Biden +4, compared to Biden +10 currently. In other words, it’s sure to be another competitive race.

STATE LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 24

On February 18, 2022, the New Jersey Legislative Reapportionment Commission voted to approve a new set of state legislative maps. These maps take effect for New Jersey’s 2023 legislative elections. Washington Township will now be part of Legislative District 24. Previously, we were part of District 25. Washington Township Morris County has been added to the Sussex County legislative district. The new Directs are effective for 10 years – till 2030. This will be our Legislative District until at least the next census and redistricting in 2030.

What that means to you is that we will now have a different State Senator and State Assemblymen representing us. Our Legislative district is redder, and our state representatives are more far right.

See the links below to learn more about your new representatives.

Below are maps of the new districts. Left side is closeup of LD 24. Right side shows full map of NJ with Legislative Districts. Click on center arrows to increase and change view.

image on left is closeup of LD 24 map – image on right full map of NJ Legislative districts
click on center arrow to change view
https://www.apportionmentcommission.org/adoption2022map.asp

Check out your new representatives. You can see their legislative history, bios and other information. Become aware of who is representing you and the values they espouse. Click the link or simply google them. https://www.njleg.state.nj.us/legislative-roster

All three representatives were re-elected in the November 2021 election, so their term expires January 9, 2024. They will be running for re-election in November 2023 – next year.

Members of the New Jersey State Senate serve four-year terms and are not subject to term limits. Known as the “2-4-4” cycle, Senators serve four-year terms, except in the first term of a new decade, which only lasts for two years. New Jersey legislators assume office at noon of the second Tuesday in January following the election.

New Jersey state assembly members serve two-year terms, with all seats up for election every two years. New Jersey holds elections for its legislature in odd years.



Redistricting explained in brief

What is districting?

Every 10 years, as required by the Constitution, each state reconfigures its congressional districts in response to population changes measured by the official U.S. census count. This year, New Jersey’s population growth was larger than expected, allowing it to keep all 12 of its Congressional House seats.

Currently, Democrats hold 10 of the 12 congressional seats in New Jersey. In the House of Representatives, Democrats hold a nine-vote edge over Republicans.

Who drew the new maps?

The New Jersey Redistricting Commission starts off as a 12-member body and is responsible for drawing the congressional district map. It is separate from the New Jersey Apportionment Commission, which is charged with redrawing state legislative district boundaries once a decade.

What did the commissions do?

The Redistricting Commission redrew the congressional district boundary lines, based on census data.

There are fewer written rules for the composition of congressional districts than for legislative districts. The process is mostly driven by the U.S. Voting Rights Act and case law.

On December 22, 2021, the Redistricting Commission adopted the “New Jersey Congressional Districts: 2022-2031” map. The adopted map was filed with the Secretary of State on January 6, 2022.

As for the NJ Legislative Districts, neither the legislative map drawn by the Democrats, nor the Republicans was adopted. Instead, after deliberating, officials came to a historic compromise on what the state’s legislative districts will look like for the rest of the decade. For the first time, the Legislative Apportionment Commission came to a bipartisan consensus without needing the 11th committee member to cast a tiebreaking vote. The commission approved the map with nine votes in favor and two votes opposed. On February 18, 2022, the Apportionment Commission adopted the “New Jersey Legislative Districts: 2022-2030” map.



Deep Dive Information:

(For the political science wonks out there)

Redistricting is the process of enacting new congressional and state legislative district boundaries. Upon completion of the 2020 census, New Jersey will draft and enact new district maps. This article chronicles the 2020 redistricting cycle in New Jersey.

New Jersey’s 12 United States representatives and 120 state legislators are all elected from political divisions called districts. District lines are redrawn every 10 years following completion of the United States census. Federal law stipulates that districts must have nearly equal populations and must not discriminate on the basis of race or ethnicity.

See the sections below for further information on the following topics:

  1. Apportionment and release of census data: This section details the 2020 apportionment process, including data from the United States Census Bureau.
  2. Drafting process: This section details the drafting process for new congressional and state legislative district maps.
  3. Enactment: This section provides information about the enacted congressional and state legislative district maps.
  4. Court challenges: This section details court challenges to the enacted congressional and state legislative district maps.
  5. Background: This section summarizes federal and state-based requirements for redistricting at both the congressional and state legislative levels. A summary of the 2010 redistricting cycle in New Jersey is also provided.
Apportionment and release of census data

Apportionment is the process by which representation in a legislative body is distributed among its constituents. The number of seats in the United States House of Representatives is fixed at 435. The United States Constitution dictates that districts be redrawn every 10 years to ensure equal populations between districts. Every ten years, upon completion of the United States census, reapportionment occurs.[1]

Apportionment following the 2020 census

The U.S. Census Bureau delivered apportionment counts on April 26, 2021. New Jersey was apportioned 12 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. This represented neither a gain nor a loss of seats as compared to apportionment after the 2010 census.[2]

Drafting process

In New Jersey, congressional and state legislative district boundaries are drawn by two distinct politician commissions. The congressional redistricting commission comprises the following 13 members:[9]

  1. The majority and minority leaders of each chamber of the New Jersey State Legislature appoint two commissioners a piece (for a total of eight members).
  2. The chairs of the state’s two major political parties each appoint two members to the commission (for a total of four members). Commissioners appointed by the political parties cannot be members of Congress or congressional employees.
  3. The first 12 commissioners appoint the last member. This member cannot have held public office in the state within the previous five-year period. If the first 12 commissioners cannot agree on an appointment, they must submit two names to the New Jersey Supreme Court. The court must then appoint the final commissioner.

If the congressional redistricting commission fails to reach an agreement about a redistricting plan, it must submit two plans to the state Supreme Court, which must in turn select from those two plans a final map.[9]

The state legislative redistricting commission comprises 10 members. The chairs of the state’s two major political parties each appoint five members to the commission. In the event that this commission is unable to reach an agreement about a redistricting plan, the state Supreme Court may appoint a tie-breaking member.[9]

State law requires that state legislative districts meet the following criteria:[9]

  1. Districts must be contiguous.
  2. Districts “must be as nearly compact as possible.”
  3. Municipalities “must be kept intact, except where otherwise required by law.”

There are no such requirements in place for congressional districts.[9]

Committees and/or commissions involved in the process

In New Jersey, two commissions are involved in the redistricting process: the New Jersey Legislative Reapportionment Commission and the New Jersey Congressional Redistricting Commission. As of June 15, 2021, these commissions had the following members:[15][16][17][18]

A majority of the New Jersey Supreme Court voted to select John Wallace, a retired New Jersey Supreme Court judge, to act as a tiebreaker on the congressional redistricting commission.[23] His selection came after the 12 members of the state Congressional Redistricting Commission (six Democrats and six Republicans) did not agree on a 13th member by the July 15, 2021, deadline, meaning the decision went to the seven-member New Jersey Supreme Court.


NJ State Legislature Information

Four states, LouisianaMississippiNew Jersey and Virginia hold their state legislative elections in odd-numbered years. New Jersey began holding elections in odd-numbered years when the state adopted a new constitution in 1947. Prior to the new constitution, members of the Assembly were elected to one-year terms, members of the Senate to three-year terms and governors to three-year terms. The new constitution changed the term structure to include two years for representatives and four-year terms for senators and governors. Because the constitution was adopted in an odd-numbered year, elections were also held in odd-numbered years and have continued in such a manner to this day

State Senator Qualifications

In order to be a candidate to run for the New Jersey State Senate, a candidate must:[1]

  • Be a citizen of the United States
  • Be 30 years of age or older.
  • Reside in the state for a minimum of four years prior to the general election.
  • Reside in the legislative district for two years prior to the general election.

The New Jersey Senate is the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature. It consists of 40 Senators. Members of the New Jersey State Senate serve four-year terms and are not subject to term limits. Known as the “2-4-4” cycle, Senators serve four-year terms, except in the first term of a new decade, which only lasts for two years. New Jersey legislators assume office at noon of the second Tuesday in January following the election.

As of the 2020 Census, New Jersey state senators represented an average of 232,224 residents. After the 2010 Census, each member represented 219,797 residents.

State Assembly Qualifications

In order to be a candidate to run for the New Jersey General Assembly, a candidate must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States
  • Be 21 years of age or older.
  • Reside in the state for a minimum of two years prior to the general election.
  • Reside in the legislative district for one year prior to the general election.

The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature. The Assembly consists of 80 members. Two members are elected from each of New Jersey’s 40 legislative districts for a term of two years.

As of the 2020 Census, New Jersey state representatives represented an average of 116,112 residents. After the 2010 Census, each member represented 109,898 residents.

See for more information:

https://ballotpedia.org/Redistricting_in_New_Jersey_after_the_2020_census

https://ballotpedia.org/New_Jersey_state_legislative_districts


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